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Press Release

What Lurks in the Turf

In Press Release Written by Carolyn Powers on Thursday, February 18, 2010

 

Scientific Plant Service: more than memories are left behind after the game

 
PRLog (Press Release) – Feb 18, 2010 – Baltimore, MD – Once the team is in the locker room, the stands emptied and the stadium lights dark, there is a lot more left behind than the echo of cheers. Game after game, lurking and lying in the turf, are things so surprising, grown men don’t even like to discuss them.

What mystery lies in wait? Ken Mays, President of Scientific Plant Service (SPS), describes the culprit as “everything from buttons and pins to broken glass fragments embedded in the artificial turf of school and professional ball fields.”

“Artificial turf, much like carpeting, requires maintenance, cleaning and vacuuming,” he says. “Objects trapped in the surface over the course of a season pose hazards to players and degrade the turf over time. “

In addition, bird and animal droppings, food and drink spillage, tape, fabric, body fluids and other materials get into the surface causing the rubber infill to degrade and accumulate. Cleaning artificial turf reduces potential damage to the surface, but also decreases the possibility of bacteria, fungi and mildew and increases turf lifespan.

“It can cost eight-hundred thousand to a million dollars to have an artificial turf field installed,” says Mays, “it just makes good fiscal sense to take care of it and prolong the life of the investment. It also decreases any health or minor injury issues.”

While routine maintenance is performed, typically, by facility staff, SPS services artificial turf two to four times annually. This revitalizes the infill surface using a Verti-Top groomer . Through this process the turf is de-compacted, cleaned and leveled with a single pass over the turf. The machine agitates the turf to bring debris to the surface which is then vacuumed simultaneously as it clears the air of any resultant dust.

The final process includes the passing of a magnet, exclusive to SPS, to remove all metallic foreign matter. A trailing brush does a final leveling of the infill surface. Clegg meter tests have proven that a softer de-compacted playing surface is achieved from this process.

When foreign substances are not removed regularly from artificial turf, the surface becomes “tighter” due to small particles filling in the air spaces of the infill.
“This causes the infill to get harder,” says Mays “and reduces drainage capabilities, allows for weeds to develop and reduces the life span of the surface.”
This kind of maintenance is undoubtedly healthier for the players, but it is also healthier for the turf, giving it a longer-lasting life long after the stadium goes dark.

Scientific Plant Service (SPS) has been the Baltimore area’s preeminent turf, lawn and tree care service since 1957. Experts at landscape maintenance, Scientific Plant Service provide every facet of care that protects the landscape investment, keeping it green, while being green.
For more information about SPS, go online at www.spsonline.com or call 410-321-0970. 

Scientific Plant Service Launches New Look, New Logo

In Press Release Written by Carolyn Powers on Thursday, February 25, 2010

PRLog (Press Release) – Feb 21, 2010 – Baltimore, MD – 
          Scientific Plant Service, Inc. (SPS), Baltimore’s premier lawn and landscape healthcare service for 53 years, is launching a new look in 2010. Long recognized for their venerable tree logo within the industry, and in neighborhoods in four counties surrounding Baltimore, Ken Mays, President of SPS has unveiled the new ‘look.’
          “SPS has remained on the forefront of high-tech lawn and landscape care for years,” says Mays. “Our old logo has been very good to us, but we wanted to move forward with something that reflected both our commitment to superior technology in turf and tree care, and our overall concern for the environment.”
          The logo took a little over two months and various iterations. Inspired by a concept that Mays himself presented, the final mark flows from left to right, showing progressive movement – as toward new developments in science and plant care, green symbolizing SPS’ customer commitment to healthy landscapes as well as a reduction of its environmental footprint. The word “Scientific” appears in brown, connecting SPS to the earth, the foundation of its work and partner in keeping turf and plants healthy.

 

Old Logo New Logo


          The blue dots fanning out from the base of the mark symbolize the company’s dedication to agriscience via stylized molecular compounds, while simultaneously representing water droplets reflective of both SPS’ aquatic disciplines and its commitment to the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The new tagline for SPS, which will appear beneath the mark, reads: Environmental Stewards since 1957.
          “We are still in the process of rolling the logo into various applications,” says Mays. “SPS will complete the transition onto our website, into our forthcoming brochures – and, of course, on SPS trucks seen in the community.” Mays has already distributed his client newsletter with the new logo and hopes that his clients embrace the new look.
          “I assured them that the company is still in the same hands! We felt it was time to move forward with a fresher, more current look – and we will continue to offer our customers tools that help us, help them, including an updated website, in the months to come,” he said.
          The logo was developed with the public relations firm of VERB! Communications and graphic designer, Chris Borges of Borges Creative, Inc.
          Scientific Plant Service (SPS) has been the Baltimore area’s preeminent turf, lawn and tree care service since 1957. Experts at landscape maintenance, Scientific Plant Service provide every facet of care that protects the landscape investment, keeping it green, while being green. For more information about SPS, go online at www.spsonline.com or call 410-32

Baltimore’s Scientific Plant Service Develops “Greener” Footprint

In Press Release Written by Carolyn Powers on Friday, May 01, 2009

Baltimore, MD – Environmental impact, superior results and good fiscal sense play into Scientific Plant Services (SPS) decision to ‘go green’ with a new fertilizer.   


          The Baltimore-area’s preeminent lawn and landscape service has developed a custom blend of POLYON® fertilizer with special emphasis placed on the potential impact of nitrogen on the Chesapeake Bay. Working with Harrell’s, LLC of Lakeland, Florida, the exclusive distributor of POLYON® , Agrium Advanced Technologies, SPS has created a fertilization program that is not only more effective, it’s environmentally conscientious.


          Advanced polyurethane coating technology is the secret. The patented polymer coating predictably controls the release of nutrients, making it possible to apply less nitrogen with a greater effect than that of conventional sulfur coated urea products. POLYON’s release mechanism is dependent upon soil temperature and moisture, which means nutrients are released only when conditions are favorable for the turf to utilize them. The company currently applies 43 percent less granular fertilizer than it did in 2007. The applied rates of nitrogen have been reduced 30-50 percent with no sacrifice in quality results. This “smart” fertilizer – knowing when to release nutrients and when not to – prevents the risk of wasted nitrogen and excessive nutrient run-off in the Chesapeake Bay.


          As its client base is located in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, SPS aims to reduce its own eco-impact and provide service that is in-line with its green philosophy. In working with Harrell’s, SPS developed a fertilizer blend that is not only smarter, but reduces the number of times a lawn needs to be fertilized – by half – and that means reduced highway trips.


          For Ken Mays, President of SPS, this just makes good sense for both the company and for his clients.
              “Reducing truck trips to fertilize lawns not only means we have a superior product for our clients – one that needs fewer applications – it translates into less time on the road, reducing our company’s emissions by half,” says Mays. “Normally, SPS would make three to four trips annually to fertilize a landscape. Our athletic fields at schools and colleges and select commercial accounts receive a single Polyon application which lasts the entire year. While POLYON is a more exclusive, expensive fertilizer, reducing the number of trips off-sets the cost and we provide a ‘greener’ service with greener results.”


          Polyon® is produced by Agriun Avanced Technologies Pursell Industries of Sylacauga, Alabama and is a is a registered trademark of RLC Technologies, LLC and distributed exclusively by Harrell’s Professional Fertilizer Solutions. Scientific Plant Service has been servicing residential and commercial customers with lawn and landscape health care since 1957. SPS strives to create the safest, most productive micro-environments for more abundant landscapes and healthier trees and shrubs. For more information on Polyon or Scientific Plant Service please contact 410.321.0970.

Timed-Release
Nitrogen

Slow-Release
Nitrogen



(methelyne urea)
(SCU Sulphur coated urea)

Fast-Release
Nitrogen



(nitrate, ammonia, urea)
(typical of commodity fertilizers)

Lasts 2, 3, 6 or 9 months Lasts 6 to 8 weeks Lasts only 2 to 4 weeks
Too much rain or overwatering does not affect release Too much rain or overwatering speed release Too much rain or overwatering speeds release
Resists leaching Can leach in heavy rains Is quickly dissolved, then leached or washed away
Release based on soil temperature Release based on soil moisture Release based on soil mositure
Will not burn lawn or plants Not likely to burn lawn Can burn lawn and plants
Saves Time and Money Saves some time Appears cheaper, but really isn't

New Maryland Law Impacting Home Owners & Commercial Lawn Business, Passes

In Press Release Written by Carolyn Powers on Tuesday, April 19, 2011

                                   Industry leader paves way to save the Bay with patented fertilizer

Baltimore, MD -- Turf, (in the form of maintained lawns), has fast become Maryland’s largest crop, surpassing corn. It will, soon, surpass all row crops combined. With residential and commercial lawns and golf course turf maintenance, run-off (from fertilizer) has become a paramount concern to Chesapeake Bay advocates.

     Just last week, the Maryland legislature passed SB 487 and HB 573 into law which addresses the impact of both fertilizer content and application, the results of which impact fertilizer ingredients, labeling, certification, at-home and commercial use.

     Ken Mays, President of Scientific Plant Service (SPS), Inc. along with other ‘green’ industry experts, worked with the Chesapeake Bay Commission and legislators, to draft a bill that would be both effective in reducing nitrogen run-off as well as one that coincides with industry best practices.

     “It is important, not only to support environmental initiatives to protect the Chesapeake Bay through its watershed, but imperative that legislators understand what the lawn and landscape industry is doing on its own, and what tools we currently use, to reduce nitrogen runoff,” said Mays.

     According to the Chesapeake Bay Commission “14 percent of the nitrogen (N) and 8 percent of the phosphorus (P) pollution to the Bay can be traced back to urban and suburban nonpoint sources, predominantly fertilizer runoff.” This law applies to turf care at locations such as golf courses, businesses, cemeteries, public properties and private residences. 
     The new law restricts the use of fertilizer
          • in winter, or when the ground is frozen,
          • the distribution of fertilizer immediately adjacent to bodies of water
          • prohibits the use of fertilizer as a de-icer, and prohibits the label from suggesting this as a potential use
          • mandates that all fertilizer applicators be certified or supervised by a certified applicator and
          • requires that fertilizer labels include the following statement:

          Do not apply near water, storm drains or drainage ditches. Do not apply if heavy rain is expected. Apply this
            product only to your lawn and sweep any product that lands on the driveway, sidewalk or street,
             back onto your lawn.

      The new law also prohibits the application of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) or commercial applicators to apply the fertilizer
      before  March 1 or after November 16.

      The Maryland Department of Agriculture will require commercial applicators to be licensed and certified and will maintain a list of all certified fertilizer applicators in Maryland and, along with the University of Maryland, will develop and disseminate consumer information for lawn fertilizer application.

     “SPS understands its stewardship of the Bay while keeping landscapes healthy,” said Mays. “In 2008 our company introduced a new fertilizer - POLYON® -- specifically chosen because of its positive impact of less nitrogen on the Chesapeake Bay,” says Mays. “We are utilizing a product that already has a reduced rate of 30-50 percent of nitrogen.”

    
POLYON’s release mechanism is dependent upon soil temperature and moisture, meaning nutrients are released only when conditions are favorable for the turf to utilize them. The company currently applies 43 percent less granular fertilizer than it did in 2007. The applied rates of nitrogen have been reduced 30-50 percent with no sacrifice in quality results. This “smart” fertilizer – knowing when to release nutrients and when not to – prevents the risk of wasted nitrogen and excessive nutrient run-off in the Chesapeake Bay.

     Mays, along with Mark Schlossberg, President of ProLawnPlus, a regular lobbyist on behalf of Maryland’s green industry to state legislators, helped develop a bill with lawmakers and the Chesapeake Bay Commission that worked for everyone.

     “We brought everyone in and asked everyone to do a little bit more, in the end everybody wanted to do their part to clean up the Bay – we were really pleased with the cooperation we got from all the stakeholders,” said Maryland Director, Chesapeake Bay Commission, Bevin Buchheister.

The law goes into effect in various stages allowing applicators to conform to the new regulations and will take full effect in 2013.
                                                                             # # #
                                         Click here to view Fact sheet on POLYON® fertilizer.